The Gossman Mentorship
(about us)

Forestry/Botany

Go straight to photos

Ichthyology

Introduction

Although there was only one returning team member this year, the botany team accomplished a lot during these past two semesters. Working under the guidance of Dr. Neese, a professional botanist, they catalogued and examined over two hundred specimens of plants. Besides cataloguing plants, they also conducted a field burn. As part of prairie restoration on the farm, it is necessary to burn the field every 2 to 3 years.

Goal

The goal of the Botany team is to see their work submitted and recognized by herbariums in Iowa and Illinois. While Botany groups from previous years were focused on collecting different plant species, the current team is more interested in identifying the majority of the samples collected. The current list of plants identified can be found here. Ultimately, they hope to discover a rare or endangered plant species.

Method for Collecting Plants

  1. In an area abundant with the desired species of plant, one should look for the best example of said specimen (i.e. No torn or wilted leaves. The entire blossom should be intact.

  2. Take a picture of the specimen. Note: Keep in mind the scale. Donít take a photo of the specimen standing too close or too far away.

  3. Carefully dig the specimen out of the good. Be careful to take a good sample of the root system.

  4. Store the specimen in a safe carrying bag. There should be some sort of identification on the bag listing the location of the specimen and the collector.

 Method for Pressing Plants

 

The most common way to press plants is to use a plant press; however, if you donít currently own one, hereís an easy way to make a press using common household supplies.

For more information on plant pressing, you can visit one of these sites.

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/edu/activities/time/plant_press.htm
http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/wq/plants/plantid/press.html
http://www.agri.idaho.gov/animal/PressPlant.htm

Top

Botany Photographs
Click on image for larger view

Week of February 5-6: The Field Burn
Flames rage through the grass... ... leaving behind ashes Botany members viewing their handiwork Botany members working with the flames
Flames rage through the grass...

 

... leaving behind ashes

 

Botany members viewing their handiwork Botany members working with the flames

 

Botany member putting out the flame The image of botany members are distorted behind the smoke Smoke billowing from the grass Smoke drifts across the terrain
Botany member putting out the flame

 

The image of botany members are distorted behind the smoke

 

Smoke billowing from the grass

 

Smoke drifts across the terrain

 

Botany member cleaning the area The ground still smokes after the fire is put out Fire burns through the field The scorched ground
Botany member cleaning the area

 

The ground still smokes after the fire is out

 

Fire burns through the field

 

The scorched ground

 

Botany member scorches ground Botany members working to burn the dry grass Flames blaze through the dry grass Mentor Mr. David Gossman and botany members observe the handiwork
Botany member quenches flames

 

Botany members working to burn the dry grass

 

Flames blaze through the dry grass

 

Mentor Mr. David Gossman and botany members observe the handiwork

 

 
Week of November 5-7
In a wild habitat, life often takes advantage of 
death, as demonstrated here with the trees growing atop a dead tree stump... ... and here, as fungus grows on dead branches.
In a wild habitat, life often takes advantage of death, as demonstrated here with the trees growing atop a dead tree stump...

 

... and here, as fungus grows on dead branches.

 

More fungus A photojournalism member observing the botany

More fungus

 

A photojournalism member observing the botany

 

Top

Week of October 15-17

A small sapling growing in the protection of a tube

A small, baby oak tree

Another small, baby oak tree
A small sapling growing in the protection of a tube

 

A small, baby oak tree

 

Another small, baby oak tree

 

A The botany team takes a moment to admire the many caves on the farm A native dogwood shrub found on the farm
A botany member seats herself atop a giant cottonwood

 

The botany team takes a moment to admire the many caves on the farm

 

A native dogwood shrub found on the farm

 

Another dogwood shrub The leaves of this multiflora rose bush can be used to make a delicious tea in the wintertime Another baby red oak
Another dogwood shrub

 

The leaves of this multiflora rose bush can be used to make a delicious tea in the wintertime.  This is one of the invasive species the botany team has been working at eradicating.

 

Another baby red oak

 

Mentor David Gossman shows a large red oak to the botany group Botany member holds an American Ginger leaf in her hand Vines fall over the opening of a cave
Mentor David Gossman shows a large black oak to the botany group

 

Botany member holds an American Ginger leaf in her hand

 

Vines fall over the opening of a cave

 

Lemon balm is found growing over the paths A dead tree is marked for harvesting

Lemon balm is found growing over the paths

 

A box elder marked for salvage logging

 

Top

(c)  Jessica Liu and Yifan Sun

Ornithology

Botany/Forestry

Geology

Miscellaneous

Contact Info

Back to
treefarmproducts.com